Kevin H. Gardner

Kevin Gardner, PhD, is the founding director of the ASRC’s Structural Biology Initiative. A molecular biophysicist and biochemist, he was appointed in September 2013, joining CUNY from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.

Dr. Gardner is an international leader in using combinations of structural biology methods, including NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, to probe how cellular proteins perceive and react to changes in the environments around them. Dr. Gardner and his research team have discovered that a diverse group of such proteins use similar mechanisms of signaling and regulation despite sensing radically different stimuli. His lab is exploring how these processes can be artificially controlled, leading to the development of new anti-cancer therapies and research tools. Dr. Gardner and his research group are working with expert biochemists, chemists, cell biologists and engineers to test new applications for these exciting discoveries.

Dr. Gardner received his Ph.D. in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry from Yale University in 1995 and was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Toronto. He joined UT Southwestern in 1998 as the inaugural W.W. Caruth Jr. Scholar in Biomedical Research and was later named the Virginia Lazenby O’Hara Chair in Biochemistry.  At CUNY, in addition to directing the ASRC Structural Biology Initiative, Dr. Gardner is the Einstein Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at The City College of New York.  He is also involved in different roles with several biotech companies, including serving as co-founder and CSO of Optologix, LLC.

Dr. Gardner has organized many national and international conferences in the fields of structural biology and biochemistry, including the 2014 International Conference for Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems. His honors include a Searle Scholars’ Award, a GRC Chairs’ Hall of Fame designation from the Gordon Research Conferences and awards in both teaching and mentorship from the UT Southwestern Medical Center.

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Structural and functional studies of proteins which sense environmental change, aiming to understand natural regulation and guide artificial control.